Kayaking Canyon Lake

I took a vacation day from work last Friday to go kayaking at Canyon Lake.

It is now the season when the snowbirds will be filtering in, and I wanted to be on the water enjoying a peaceful morning.

Canyon Lake is the third of four man-made lakes along the Salt River. Roosevelt Lake is first in line; the Roosevelt Dam providing hydroelectric power for the Valley.

Apache Lake is next, just beyond Tortilla Flat. Canyon Lake is the most popular for residents of the East Valley, with swimming, boating, and camping amenities. It is a twenty minute drive from my house, which makes it even more attractive. Continue reading “Kayaking Canyon Lake”

Dowsing

Call me a skeptic.

The Superstition Mountains have a lot of legends and myths surrounding them. Or maybe they surround the myths and legends.

I have been fortunate to have met many of the old timers that grew up chasing the Lost Dutchman’s mine.

The Dutchman was neither lost, nor Dutch. He did find gold. He died, and his mine, which may have never been a mine, has been lost. Continue reading “Dowsing”

Colors of Spring

For 10 months of every year the Sonoran Desert, especially the Valley, is various shades of brown and tan with specks of green. The green, of course, being the saguaro, the prickly pear, the cholla and what we call grass.

In spring the ocotillo will sport crimson flowers on their shafts for a few weeks. After monsoon, of course the green desert grasses overtake the barren landscape. But the expanses of green are rare and short. Continue reading “Colors of Spring”

There ain’t no Saguaro in Texas

40 foot saguaroPicket Post was an Army outpost built in 1870 during the height of the Indian Wars. An outpost lookout for Camp Pinal, it served to protect the camp and the Silver King mine from Apache raiders.

Located just outside of Superior, AZ, Picket Post Mountain is full of history.

Everyone has heard the legend of the Lost Dutchman’s gold mine. There is another legend, the legend of the lost Colt Dragoons. Continue reading “There ain’t no Saguaro in Texas”

Feeling Superior

The first time I visited Superior, AZ, it was the epitome of a derelict former mining town. The buildings along the main drag were derelict, boarded up, crumbling. In many cases the facades hid an interior that was open to the sky.

There were a few struggling businesses catering to tourists, but not very much to induce one to spend more than a couple hours strolling. In six short years, that has changed dramatically. Continue reading “Feeling Superior”

Crown King obstacles

Here is video of my attempts to cross the first obstacle on the road from Lake pleasant to Crown King.

There are two such obstacles on the trail. It took me few tries to get over the rocks.  Next time I know the trick.

Crown King

At the staging area.

Saturday we took the RZR on the first real workout since I bought it. My boss lent me his truck, and JD, a friend, lent me his trailer. We went to Lake Pleasant, AZ (elevation 1700 ft.)Our destination was over the mountain, to Crown King (elevation 5900). We went from desert to mountains, from scrub brush and cactus to towering pines. Continue reading “Crown King”

Prescott, AZ

I went to Prescott (pronounced press-kit) AZ after Christmas. Prescott is known for Whiskey Row, once a notorious street populated by saloons and whore houses.  The likes of Doc Holiday and Wyatt Earp walked the streets and visited the businesses of Whiskey Row.

The Hotel St. Michael occupies the corner of the block, and marks the beginning of Whiskey Row. The Palace is next door… the oldest restaurant in Arizona.

The Palace is a tourist trap. I found out the hard way when I waited fifteen minutes at the bar to not be served. Continue reading “Prescott, AZ”